How to make graph in Flat Spreadsheet? – LabCollector

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How to make graph in Flat Spreadsheet?

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SUMMARY:

Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN), provides you with a rich text editor that allows you to use a page with many functions, like the photo, plate, chemistry editor, creating LabCollector links to reagents and supplies, copy-pasting from Word document directly, and many more. It also provides you with various spreadsheets for creating graphs. ELN provides you with 2 graphs: Flat spreadsheet (simple) and Zoho spreadsheet (more like excel).

Follow the steps below to start with the Flat spreadsheet:-

1. Guide and formulas to use

2. Creating Graphs

3. Tips on creating graphs

1. Guide and formulas to use

  • Flat spreadsheet allows to use Shortcuts guide that help you navigate through the flat spreadsheet.
  • To open it go to HOME -> BOOK -> EXPERIMENT -> PAGE -> FLAT SPREADSHEET -> EDIT 
  • Inside the spread sheet you can add the values and formulas that you like.
  • Please read the KB how to use Flat spreadsheet.

2. Creating Graphs

  • You can copy paste values from excel sheets. However you need to take care what can and cannot be pasted from excel. 
    Please refer to our KB on what can be pasted from excel charts.
  • Once you have the values you want to plot the graph for, click on Graph option.
  • Once you click the graph button you will see.
    *The below fields will be empty and there will be no graph next to it, we have just shown some values already for example purposes.

    • NOTE: Select the cells for a particular range and then click on “pick” button to automatically pick the cell number.
    • 1. Here you can write the title for your graph, like shown in the image.
    • 2. Here you can select the type of the graph you want.
    • 3. Labels range allows you to select the name of you legends on X-axis.
    • 4. Values range is where you add the values to be represented in your graph.
    • 5. Legend range is where you add the name of your legends.
    • 6. Here you can either refresh to see the graph or any changes you make in the values. You can click on remove to remove the graph.

3. Tips/Examples on creating graphs

  • Now you can create various types of graphs.
  • Doughnut Chart
    • Pie and doughnut charts are probably the most commonly used charts. They are divided into segments, the arc of each segment shows the proportional value of each piece of data. They are excellent at showing the relational proportions between data.

    • You can see an example below.
    • Warning
      Please do not add any special character with the value. For eg 20%, 30$, etc. This values wont get detected.
    • Tips/Hints
      To name the parts of chart, add the name and number with special character in the “labels range” section. Like the image below.
  • Pie Chart
    • You can see an example below.
    • Warning
      Please do not add any special character with the value. For eg 20%, 30$, etc. This values wont get detected.
    • Tips/Hints
      To name the parts of chart, add the name and number with special character in the “labels range” section. Like the image below.
  • Radar Chart
    • A radar chart is a way of showing multiple data points and the variation between them. They are often useful for comparing the points of two or more different data sets.

    • You can see an example below.
    • Warning
      Please do not add any special character with the value. For eg 20%, 30$, etc. This values wont get detected.
  • Scatter Chart
    • Scatter charts are based on basic line charts with the x axis changed to a linear axis. To use a scatter chart, data must be passed as objects containing X and Y properties.
    • You can see an example below.
    • Warning
      Please do not add any special character with the value. For eg 20%, 30$, etc. This values wont get detected.
    • Tips/Hints
      To help you with correlation of your scatter plots, please see the explanation & image below.
      When the two sets of data are strongly linked together we say they have a High Correlation.

      • Correlation is Positive when the values increase together, and
      • Correlation is Negative when one value decreases as the other increases

      PS: Image & explanation from mathisfun.com

  • Polar area Chart
    • Polar area charts are similar to pie charts, but each segment has the same angle – the radius of the segment differs depending on the value. This type of chart is often useful when we want to show a comparison data similar to a pie chart, but also show a scale of values for context.

    • You can see an example below.
    • Warning
      Please do not add any special character with the value. For eg 20%, 30$, etc. This values wont get detected.


  • Line Chart
    • A line chart is a way of plotting data points on a line. Often, it is used to show trend data, or the comparison of two data sets.
    • You can see an example below.

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